Articles

Jun
16

Oscar Pistorius, a double-amputee sprinter set on competing in the Olympic Games, was banned from competition by the International Association of Athletics Federation (“IAAF”) after it found his prosthetic legs gave him an unfair advantage over other runners. On appeal, the Court of Arbitration for Sport held that Pistorius had no such advantage, but the

Jun
16

In the high-bandwidth Internet age, video sharing websites such as YouTube and Yahoo! Video are growing in popularity. The ease with which such sharing is accomplished has aided users in illegally uploading copyrighted movies, TV shows, and music. In a recent lawsuit, Viacom and its copyright-owning affiliates sought one billion dollars in damages against YouTube,

Jun
16

Reverse payments, such as the one at issue in Arkansas Carpenters Health & Welfare Fund v. Bayer AG, are controversial because they appear to be nothing more than agreements between competitors not to compete. However, because a patent was involved, the Federal Circuit refused to declare this agreement unlawful—even when the patentee offered to pay

Jun
16

In March 2008, the Federal Communications Commission auctioned licenses to sizeable tracts of radio frequency spectrum that will be vacated due to the analog-to-digital television conversion to occur in June 2009. The Commission conditioned the license to one portion of this spectrum—the “D Block”—on an unprecedented requirement: for the licensee to work hand-in-hand with public-safety

Jun
16

This article blends three areas of law: international law, comparative law and intellectual property. Specifically, this article discusses the benefits and problems associated with harmonizing United States patent laws with foreign systems. It does so by analyzing the historical and contemporary ramifications of uniform patent laws. In addition, it highlights recent attempts in Congress—The Patent

Jun
16

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission found that Rambus, a developer of computer memory technologies, failed to disclose information about its intellectual property holdings to other participants in the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC), a private standard-setting organization, during the period in which JEDEC was developing Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) standards. According to the

Jun
16

In an effort to reduce the backlog of unexamined patent applications, the United States Patent and Trademark Office created a controversial new set of rules for patent applicants. In Tafas v. Dudas, a Federal District Court judge issued a permanent injunction against the rules, finding their enactment to be outside the Patent Office’s authority. On

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