Kaspersky, Russia, and the Exposure of American National Security Secrets

Last week, news broke that hackers working for the Russian government acquired American intelligence programs by exploiting weaknesses in Kaspersky Lab, a software security program used by several agencies in the United States government. According to the Wall Street Journal, the hackers successfully acquired “details of how the U.S. penetrates foreign computer networks and defends

The Netherlands Finds Microsoft in Violation of Privacy Law

The Netherlands is often described as having an indifferent stance to drugs, LGBT rights, privacy and, well, pretty much all social issues, so when the Dutch government suggests something presents an issue worthy of regulation and enforcement, it should raise eyebrows. Recently, the Dutch body responsible for the regulation of privacy protections, the Data Protection

Fingerprints: As Irrefutable Evidence as Once Thought?

For decades now, humans have been convicted and punished on the basis of fingerprint evidence. Society has come to accept the fact that police will take fingerprint impressions of those they arrest. Citizens largely realize the government will analyze those fingerprint impressions by comparing them to unidentified fingerprints left at crime scenes. These unidentified fingerprints,

Repealing the Clean Power Plan: Devastating Blow to Clean Energy, or Empty Gesture?

On October 10th, following a speech earlier in the week in Kentucky where he declared that “the war against coal is over,” EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a repeal of the Clean Power Plan. The repeal, if successful, will likely be a blow to cleaner energy generation. However, it still might not succeed in keeping

Who Pays for Climate Change? Do Courts have a Say?

Change is expensive. Whether you’re settling into a new apartment or buying warm clothes for the winter, it takes effort to adapt to changing circumstances. Global changes, then, come with a hefty price tag. It is common knowledge that the global climate has changed at an abnormal rate over the past century. Though heated debate

Distributed Generation: An Alternative Path for Puerto Rico’s Energy Future

Although it has been about three weeks since Hurricane Maria ravaged through Puerto Rico, nearly 90 percent of the island is still without electricity. Puerto Rico’s power company (Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority or PREPA) had no shortage of problems prior to hurricanes Irma and Maria destructive visits; PREPA was $9 billion in debt and

Robots May Be Taxed in San Francisco

Human labor is increasingly being replaced by robots. Robots are cheaper to maintain, and can provide maximum efficiency. Yearly the public sees regular changes to every day experiences, like using a self-checkout line in a grocery store or automated coffee machines that use precise technology to make delicious lattés. When workers inevitably lose their jobs

You Can’t Put Lipstick on a Bad Law: Criminalization of Drones Flying over Pig Farms

In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, unmanned drones became critical tools for rescue teams in Texas. Described as a “landmark in the evolution of drone usage” by FAA Administrator Michael Huerta, pro-pilots of the small, camera-enabled flying-machines aided the National Guard in creating maps to identify the locations of survivors, show landscape changes, and

How is TC Heartland Impacting the Patent Litigation Landscape?

“TC Heartland changed the venue landscape. For the first time in 27 years, a defendant may argue credibly that venue is improper in a judicial district where it is subject to a court’s personal jurisdiction but where it is not incorporated and has no regular and established place of business.”  Westech Aerosol Corp. v. 3M