Volume 16, Issue 2

When Big Data Meets Big Brother: Why Courts Should Apply United States v. Jones to Protect People’s Data

Volume 16, Issue 2 (Jan 2015)

In an age when people’s lives are constantly tracked, recorded, analyzed, and shared by private parties, the Third-Party Doctrine, which holds that “information knowingly exposed to private parties is unprotected by the Fourth Amendment,” now threatens to swallow whole the privacy guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment. This Article suggests courts adopt the Klayman v. Obama

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Brad Turner, When Big Data Meets Big Brother: Why Courts Should Apply United States v. Jones to Protect People's Data 16 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 377 (2015), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Turner_Final.pdf

Anonymity as a Legal Right: Where and Why It Matters

Volume 16, Issue 2 (Jan 2015)

This Article examines the legal status of the right to communicate political and social ideas and criticism anonymously online. As an inherently borderless platform for communication, the Internet has generated new methods for sharing information on issues of public importance among citizens who may be thousands of miles apart. Yet governments around the world continue

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Jason A. Martin and Anthony L. Fargo, Anonymity as a Legal Right: Where and Why It Matters 16 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 311 (2015), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Martin-_-Fargo_Final.pdf

Till Death Do Us Part?!: Online Mediation as an Answer to Divorce Cases Involving Violence

Volume 16 Issue 2 (Jan 2015)

“Till death do us part”—is a phrase that probably represents the wish of most married couples. However, statistically speaking, almost half of all marriages end in divorce. A sizable number of divorces involve the parameter of violence. Behind the figures, there are always human beings, the victims of violence, who endure suffering, fear, and palpable

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Dafni Lavi, Till Death Do Us Part?!: Online Mediation as an Answer to Divorce Cases Involving Violence 16 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 253 (2015), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Lavi_Final.pdf

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