Volume 15, Issue 2

Patenting Abstractions

Volume 15, Issue 2 (Jan 2014)

This Article explores whether abstract ideas can and should be patentable. Historically, the patent system’s scope has been restricted to protecting tangible products or processes as opposed to abstract ideas. Ongoing advances in information technologies, however, have blurred the boundaries of the traditional doctrine, and many recently issued patents appear to protect abstractions. A recent

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Miriam Bitton, Patenting Abstractions, 15 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 153 (2014), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Bitton_Final.pdf.

Neutral Litigants in Patent Cases

Volume 15, Issue 2 (Jan 2014)

Patent cases at the district court level are one of the most complex, time-consuming, and contentious forms of civil litigation. As an alternative to the conventional, two-sided adversarial process, this Article proposes a structural change to the manner of conducting patent litigation in the district courts: the addition of a neutral litigant who, as the

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Jeremy W. Bock, Neutral Litigants in Patent Cases, 15 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 233 (2014), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Bock_Final.pdf.

Reproduction-Powered Industry: Coordinating Agency Regulations for Synthetic Biology

Volume 15, Issue 2 (Jan 2014)

The products of synthetic biology may improve medicine, national security, environmental protection, and the economy, but under-regulated development could catastrophically compromise these endeavors. Considering the dangers exhibited by existing microorganisms and public access to tools of synthetic biology construction, the field’s untested novelty implicates human health and safety. Further, social justice concerns are raised by

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Brendan Parent, Reproduction-Powered Industry: Coordinating Agency Regulations for Synthetic Biology, 15 N.C. J.L. & Tech. 307 (2014), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Parent_Final.pdf.

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