Volume 14, Online Edition

Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc.: The Only Nonliteral Aspects of Java APIs Protected Under Copyright Law Are the Ones Nobody Wants to Copy

In 1976, Congress revised the Copyright Act, extending protection to computer programs. The scope of this protection, however, has remained unclear. While all courts agree that source code is protected from direct copying, they disagree as to the extent of protection for nonliteral elements, such as the code’s structure, sequence, and organization. Oracle America, Inc.

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Jonathan Ambrose, Recent Development, Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc.: The Only Nonliteral Aspects of Java APIs Protected Under Copyright Law Are the Ones Nobody Wants to Copy, 14 N.C. J.L. & Tech. On. 1 (2012), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Fall_Ambrose_Final.pdf.

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