Volume 14

What Now? The Future of EPA Transport Programs Following Vacatur of the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule

Transport programs provide a means for the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate states’ emissions that endanger human health in neighboring areas. The Clean Air Interstate Rule and the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule are transport programs implemented under the authority of the good neighbor provision. However, the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

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Carla M. Gray, Recent Development, What Now? The Future of EPA Transport Programs Following Vacatur of the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule, 14 N.C. J.L. & Tech. On. 103 (2012), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Fall_Gray_Final.pdf.

Interdigital v. International Trade Commission

Many patent cases turn on the meaning of terms in the patent claims. Although the standards for interpreting claims are somewhat fluid, there is a need for some degree of rigidity so inventors can protect their inventions. This Recent Development examines how the court in InterDigital Communications, LLC v. International Trade Commission applied various doctrines

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Neil Barnes, Recent Development, Interdigital v. International Trade Commission, 14 N.C. J.L. & Tech. On. 69 (2012), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Fall_Barnes_Final.pdf.

The Gap Left by the Clean Energy and Economic Security Act in NC

Following months of polarized debates, the North Carolina legislature has legalized hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling through the enactment of the Clean Energy and Economic Security Act. Public discourse has primarily tracked concerns over energy security, environmental protection, and public health. What the dialogue has failed to adequately consider is the extent to which private

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Holly Bannerman, Recent Development, The Gap Left by the Clean Energy and Economic Security Act in NC, 14 N.C. J.L. & Tech. On. 35 (2012), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Fall_Bannerman_Final.pdf.

Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc.: The Only Nonliteral Aspects of Java APIs Protected Under Copyright Law Are the Ones Nobody Wants to Copy

In 1976, Congress revised the Copyright Act, extending protection to computer programs. The scope of this protection, however, has remained unclear. While all courts agree that source code is protected from direct copying, they disagree as to the extent of protection for nonliteral elements, such as the code’s structure, sequence, and organization. Oracle America, Inc.

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Jonathan Ambrose, Recent Development, Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc.: The Only Nonliteral Aspects of Java APIs Protected Under Copyright Law Are the Ones Nobody Wants to Copy, 14 N.C. J.L. & Tech. On. 1 (2012), available at http://ncjolt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Fall_Ambrose_Final.pdf.

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